My Parents Were Right . . .Again

Hello Friends,

close up photo of person s eye

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Over Easter Break I was home from school with my family.  And I was experiencing a bit of an emotional low, which of course my parents didn’t notice because you can defiantly hide things from your mother. Just kidding, you can’t hide anything from my mother.  We call her, “The Great Eye,” because she knows all and sees all.

In talking with them I expressed some of the frustration and anxiety that I was feeling about things like finding a summer internship and disappointing people.  Often in these conversations (particularly the ones about jobs) people try to help by saying something like, “there is something better waiting for you.”  And while this is good and true advice, God does indeed work all things together for the good of those that love Him, my parents also added a little something else.  They told me to stop worrying about the results and start enjoying the process.

beautiful cascade environment falls

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They reminded me that God is working all things together for my good, and that in order to truly trust that, I need to stop worrying.  Life is a journey not a destination. There is, of course, a place for living faithfully.  But my Mom reminded me that that looks more like getting up every day and doing the best I can, the rest comes in time.

See this past year my family has been going through a somewhat scary time of turmoil.  My Dad lost his job and my parents sold their house and moved in with my grandmother.  But now God has given my Dad a new job, and my family a new house.  And as my Mom said, “that would have been a great time to worry, but I look back at this year and all I can see is how good God has been to us.”

And indeed, in spite of all my worry, God has been good to me to.

Thanks for Reading!

Until Next Time, Stay Out of Trouble!

Going to Nineveh

Hello Friends,

Today, I have a question for you: what is your Nineveh?  This is something that has been on my mind this week, as all my plans for the summer seem to be falling through.  For me, I believe my Nineveh is the Unknown.

Over these past several months, I have been working desperately to find a Summer Internship, and things seemed to be going well.  I’ve had interview after interview, and I even got one job offer. But, these past two weeks have been silent, and every moment that my phone doesn’t ring is a moment I lose hope. The job I wanted the most is now out of my reach.  That was a really hard one for me.

Last week I heard a sermon in which the pastor said, “When you pray you should say, ‘God, I want this thing; I think you want this thing for me, but if you are not going to be with me in this thing, don’t send me.’”  I prayed that this week, and God answered.  He’s not sending me.

Going to NinevehI’d like to be able to smile and say, “this is exactly what I asked for.  God works all things together for the good of those that love Him.  It’s not what He wants for me.” You get it.  In my head, I can say those things, and I do believe them.  But that doesn’t change the fact that in my heart I feel lost and disappointed.

So, what can I do with those feelings?  Is it possible to praise God for answering my prayer and at the same time mourn over the way that He answered it? Can I trust God with my future and at the same time fear the uncertainty of it?  I think a lot of people would say, “no,” that fear and disappointment show lack of faith.

I think those people are wrong.

Before he was crucified, Jesus was afraid.  He asked God not to send Him to the cross (Luke 22:42), and I’d be willing to bet that when God’s answer to that prayer was to send Him to the cross anyways, He was disappointed. Yet, He went.  And that’s the kicker, isn’t it: He went to the cross with fear and disappointment, not in spite of His trust in the Father, but because of it.

Refusing to go where God sends us, like Jonah refusing to go to Nineveh, that is lack of faith.  Feeling afraid of the Unknown and disappointed when plans don’t pan out, that is natural.  The question of faith is not necessarily a question of how you feel about the events of life.  It is more often a question of, when you feel disappointed and afraid, will you go to Nineveh anyway.

 

PC: Marcelo Vaz